End-User Security Awareness

Change end-user behavior and achieve compliance with appropriate security awareness education  

The SCIPP EUSA Certificate Program provides end-users with an internationally-recognized, effective, and efficient security awareness program for end-users of organizational enterprise networks. This online course is a non-technical awareness course designed to inform and educate. It covers common security errors by employees that jeopardize an organization’s information assets, and the systems that are used to protect, process, store and transmit corporate data.

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Course Outline

  • Access Control
  • Malicious Code
  • Internet Communications
  • Asset Management
  • Human Resource Security
  • Physical and Environmental Security
  • Social Engineering
  • Business Continuity Management
  • Policies and Compliance
  • Incident Reporting

Industry Specific Modules

SCIPP has developed seven industry specific modules that can be bolted on to the standard Security Awareness Course to provide a deeper dive into the roles, functions, issues and compliance areas specific to your industry

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This course will explain common critical facets of security best practices such as:

  • What computer security is and why it is important at your company (e.g., confidentiality, integrity and availability)
  • The rationale for security policies and how to complete the mission while following those policies (e.g., Personally Identifiable Information – PII, Identity theft, Ethics)
  • Ways that unscrupulous people and programs try to trick people into revealing information (e.g., phishing and social engineering)
  • Mistakes people make that put private information at risk (e.g., weak passwords, and installing non-approved programs)
  • The importance of practicing Operation Security – OPSEC (e.g., communication over insecure media)
  • Making sure information resources are available when needed and not accessible to unauthorized people. (e.g., storing and transmitting sensitive data)
  • Ways to protect themselves from unwanted communications (e.g., spam, e-mail security, and hoaxes)
  • The dangers of not securing data stores (e.g., laptop / desktop security and physical protection of assets)
  • Simple actions users can take every day to support a safe and secure computing environment (e.g., situational awareness and notification when a problem occurs)